Kansas legislature recap: Final Action Includes Votes on Governor Vetoes | Free

Courtesy the League of Women Voters Kansas

The final session of the 2022 Kansas Legislature included several votes on legislation previously vetoed by Governor Laura Kelly. A summary of local legislators’ votes is found below.

This report and previous voting records of local legislators during the current legislative section may be read at the Emporia League of Women Voters’ website: https://www.lwvemporia.org/

House

Consideration of the Governor’s veto of Senate Sub. for HB 2252, which prohibits the Governor, the Secretary of State and any other officer in the executive branch from entering into a consent decree or other agreement with any state or federal court or any agreement with any other party regarding the enforcement of election law or the alteration of any election procedure without specific approval by the Legislature. Vote: Yeas 84; Nays 37; Absent or not voting: 4. The motion to override the veto prevailed. Rep. Highland, Schreiber, and E. Smith voted Yea.

Consideration of the veto of HB 2387, which creates law stating that, on or before January 31, 2023, no state agency, including the Governor, shall issue a request for proposal for the administration and provision of benefits under the medical assistance program; or enter into any new contract with managed care organizations for the administration and provision of benefits under the medical assistance program. The bill requires the Secretary of Health and Environment to continue to administer medical assistance benefits using managed care entities. Vote: Yeas 84; Nays 38; Absent or not voting: 3. The motion to override the veto prevailed. Rep. Highland, Schreiber, and E. Smith voted Yea.

HB 2136 would amend law related to sales tax remittances, authorize Atchison County to submit a question to voters regarding a local sales tax, delay the implementation of a sales tax exclusion for delivery charges, and enact the COVID-19 Retail Storefront Property Tax Relief Act. Vote: Yeas 120; Nays 1; Absent or not voting: 4. Rep. Highland, Schreiber, and E. Smith voted Yea.

HB 2540 would amend the Uniform Controlled Substances Act and the definition of “marijuana” in the Act and the Kansas Criminal Code. The amended definition would exempt U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug products containing an active ingredient derived from marijuana. Vote: Yeas 120; Nays 2; Absent or not voting: 3. Rep. Highland, Schreiber, and E. Smith voted Yea.

Senate

HB 2136 would amend law related to sales tax remittances, authorize Atchison County to submit a question to voters regarding a local sales tax, delay the implementation of a sales tax exclusion for delivery charges, and enact the COVID-19 Retail Storefront Property Tax Relief Act. Vote: Yeas 35; Absent or Not Voting 5. Sen. Longbine voted Yea.

House Sub. for SB 19 would create the Living, Investing in Values, and Ending Suicide Act. The Act would implement the established 988 Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Crisis Hotline in Kansas. The bill would outline the responsibilities of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services Hotline centers, and service providers. Additionally, the bill would provide certain protections from liability for services providers, create the 988 Coordinating Council, and require an annual report from the Council to select Legislative standing committees. Vote: Yeas 25; Nays 2; Present and Passing 9; Absent or Not Voting 4. Sen. Longbine voted Yea.

Consideration of the Governor’s veto of Senate Sub. for HB 2252, which would amend law regarding modifying election laws by agreement. The bill prohibits the Governor, the Secretary of State and any other officer in the executive branch from entering into a consent decree or other agreement with any state or federal court or any agreement with any other party regarding the enforcement of election law or the alteration of any election procedure without specific approval by the Legislature. Vote: Yeas 27; Nays 10; Absent or Not Voting 3. The motion to override the veto prevailed. Sen. Longbine voted Yea.

Consideration of the veto of HB 2387, which creates law stating that, on or before January 31, 2023, no state agency, including the Governor, shall issue a request for proposal for the administration and provision of benefits under the medical assistance program; or enter into any new contract with managed care organizations for the administration and provision of benefits under the medical assistance program. The bill requires, except to the extent prohibited by law, the Secretary of Health and Environment to continue to administer medical assistance benefits using managed care entities. Vote: Yeas 27; Nays 10; Absent or Not Voting 3. The motion to override the veto prevailed. Sen. Longbine voted Yea.

Senate Sub. for HB 2597 would amend law related to income and sales taxes and would enact the COVID-19 Retail Storefront Property Tax Relief Act. The bill would amend law related to the standard deduction, taxation of Social Security benefits and retirement plan income, carried back net operating losses, the deductibility of certain federal disallowances related to employment tax credits, and the child day care services credit. The bill would amend law related to sales tax remittances, sales tax on certain utilities, and local sales taxes.

Vote: Yeas 27; Present and Passing 8; Absent or Not Voting 5. Sen. Longbine voted Yea.

The Kansas Legislature is adjourned until January 9, 2023.

Bill descriptions and daily journals of the Kansas Legislature may be accessed through the Kansas Legislature website: http://www.kslegislature.org.

This report was prepared by the League of Women Voters of Emporia Legislators Vote Tracking Committee: Bob Grover, Doug McGaw, Mary McGaw, and Gail Milton.


http://www.emporiagazette.com/free/article_228122be-e359-11ec-bc77-63540ba26432.html

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