Rilla Contracting Looks to Expand Fencing Business / iBerkshires.com

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Sean Rilla started his fencing business three years ago after starting out in design and engineering. He’s looking to expand his client base in the Berkshires.


Sean Rilla with a hammer at one of his grandfather’s work sites. 


CHESHIRE, Mass. — Contractor Sean Rilla says he has building in his blood and that has him bringing the next generation of fencing work to Berkshire County.


He said his company, Rilla Contracting, prioritizes the customer experience by offering fresh concepts, fair pricing, and open communication.


“I’ve been building things pretty much my whole life,” said Rilla recently, adding he’s been in business for about three years and is looking to grow his client base.

“My grandparents owned a company in New York. Even when I was a little kid, I was always at job sites, I wasn’t building but I was swinging hammers at job sites when I was little.


“I did mechanical engineering for 10 years in design, in the manufacturing side of things, and I’ve always built stuff on the side but about three years ago, I decided to go on my own.”

From observing his grandfather’s interactions with customers, he identified the biggest takeaway as the solid relationships that were built around honesty, quality work, and respect.

Rilla said his fencing work has taken off locally and he would like to become a competitor for more well-known Berkshire County fencers.

“I’m a younger contractor coming up, I’m 29, and I just don’t feel like there’s a whole lot of younger people that are coming up,” he said.

“And now that the established contracting businesses are older, they’re kind of getting out of it and making room for the new guys.”

Design is a passion for the up-and-coming contractor because of his background in mechanical engineering. He worked in design for a company in Springfield, including four patents, and said he applies that attention to detail to his work.

As an example, Rilla highlighted the fences that he has constructed for Victorian homes in North County and how design plays into that process.

Many older homes in Adams and North Adams have a lot of character and, with the client’s blessing, he has used that as an inspiration for the fence. He has also designed modern fences and many for customers with dogs.


A popular signature series with a higher price point is also available.

Rilla said he likes to think outside of the box when it comes to his craft.

“A lot of times with custom fences, people see an idea that they see on the internet and they send it to me, and with my experience in mechanical engineering and design, I can create something,” he said.

The difference between fencing materials depends on a person’s comfort level with upkeep. Vinyl, for example, will essentially last a lifetime with occasional washes whereas wood needs to be stained or painted and may require replacements to problem areas like posts.

Including himself, Rilla’s company has three workers and he would eventually like to expand that number while keeping the same quality of work.

“I’d love to get to a point where I have two or three crews rolling out but I would not like to get to the point where I have so much work that I can’t give each and every job my 100 percent attention and attention to detail,” he said.

“Because that’s where I really sell myself it’s giving a customer exactly what they want.”

Rilla works out of Cheshire but services all of Berkshire County. With the warm season approaching, he is starting to get an influx of quotes and welcomes more.

For inquiries, Rilla can be reached at 413-358-3304 or by email at [email protected]

Tags: Business,   construction,   


https://www.iberkshires.com/story/67933/Rilla-Contracting-Looks-to-Expand-Fencing-Business.html

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